Extreme Makeover: Frankenstein’s Monster Edition

Somewhere along the way, Frankenstein’s monster has changed drastically. From the challenged, complex character Shelley presented, he’s become a dumb, slow icon of fear and monstrosity. He has become subject to vigorous transformations in a number of mediums. Since the original publication in 1818, there have been (at least) 24 direct adaptations. Films, television and plays have retold his story with new visions, new words and new worlds.

Some have got it right, some have got it wrong and some have included him in a time travelling adventure. What happened?

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We’ll define the original characteristics first. In Shelley’s novel, the monster is nameless. Initially, upon his creation, he is like a baby: gentle, innocent and new to the world. Victor Frankenstein assembles the monster in a gruesome Ikea fashion of stitching body parts together from… other bodies. He’s eight feet tall, enormously strong and hideous, with yellow eyes and skin that barely conceal the muscle tissue and blood vessels beneath.

(I’d feature an image here but it’s perhaps not the most appetising thing to see!)

However, he’s abandoned by his disgusted creator and shunned by every person he comes across; he’s a feared, unknown entity, prompting strangers who cross his path to expel him. His self esteem – undoubtedly – is horrendously damaged, especially when he is called:

monster”, “creature”, “demon””, “fiend”, “wretch”, “vile insect”, “abhorred monster”, “wretched devil”

It’s important to note, as well, he’s not your typical grunting, slow moving ‘monster’. He’s a smart, thinking and articulate individual. He learns how to speak English and studies literature, in particular Milton’s Paradise Lost and, when confronting Victor, even quotes the book to converse his feelings:

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Did I request thee,
Maker, from my clay
To mould Me man? Did I solicit thee
From darkness to promote me?
John Milton, Paradise Lost (X. 743–5)

He’s quite the complicated character but interesting and brilliantly sculpted nonetheless. Though he does seek (and triumph) in brutal revenge against his creator, it is because he is developed and made into a villain, he is not born one. Ultimately, it is a tragedy. The hate and expulsion from society and his father turn him into a killing machine.

So, how is Frankenstein portrayed by other artists? Let’s begin the makeover!

Frankenstein (1931) –  Boris Karloff’s depiction of the monster is perhaps the most iconic. The film spawned the image of the monster most of us know. Square, abnormally shaped head with a face riddled with scars and bolts garnishing his neck.

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He’s slow to talk and initially is gentle and innocent; however, he never really adopts the vocabulary-filled persona we see in the novel. Only in the early hours of birth are there are some similarities and while it ranks as an iconic horror film, it’s not entirely translating the original character.

67867The story gets points for having the principles present in the film; the themes are explored and the values are challenged. But the groaning, grunting creature never grows into a complicated being. Transformation in progress.

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Frankenstein Unbound (1990) -Based on Brian Aldiss’ novel, which is loosely similar to Shelley’s novel, is a time-travelling adventure. This does feature a monster and it is Frankenstein’s monster but the resemblance isn’t really there. He acts solely as an angry antagonist. I’m not sure why it had to use the same characters, an original piece would have sufficed.

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Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein (1994) –  As a film, it’s not bad. It does feature some great performances and it does touch on some of the themes in Shelley’s novel. The Creation, played by Robert De Niro, does start out on similar tracks. He’s somewhat smart, articulate and cunning.

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However, the ‘villain’ in him is brought to the surface a lot faster, vowing revenge on his creator almost immediately after being shunned by the family he helped. His killing spree starts and the rest loosely follows the book. This is perhaps an example where you can’t make us completely understand and sympathise with the Monster in the average film length. De Niro does depict the being well but the story lacks the existing fire.

Van Helsing (2004) – Not an adaptation but the monster, now named Frankenstein, is part of the monster ensemble in the Hugh Jackman lead film. He’s more Karloff in appearance than Shelley in character: he’s a gentle but strong giant and that’s it. There isn’t really evidence of him being smart and we’re far from the original; he’s there because he is a familiar monster and provides a joke or two. Is there resemblance? Physically yes. In his character? Some, there’s some!

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Frankenstein vs. the Creature from Blood Cove (2005) – I can’t say I’ve seen this one so I’ll just leave a description of the film I found:

Frankenstein’s monster is resurrected to fight terrorists along with a half-fish, half-man creature. However, the plan soon goes awry.

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…I’m… I’m not sure I can bring myself to watch this one. I think it’s safe to say the transformation has continued.

I, Frankenstein (2014) – The nod to the original novel is only in the introduction to the film and the character. It’s based on a graphic novel and it’s… interesting. Fun, action-based but like Frankenstein Unbound, I don’t think it needed to use the character Shelley created. An enjoyable story that could have been built on entirely different canvas. The monster and name were perhaps used just because it was something people would recognise. It does win a point for monster attractiveness level, however.

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Frankenstein (play) 2011 – Now, this is adaptation done right. The National Theatre production, written by Nick Dear and directed by Danny Boyle, is perhaps the best adaptation to date.

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It hit the nail right on the head with the themes Shelley original displayed. What it means to be human, how science can go too far, how to deal with the consequences. In the translation to the stage, the story remains intact and most importantly, we are given a raw depiction of Frankenstein’s monster in the truest of forms. It’s done so well and executed so precisely, it is worthy to wear the same title as Shelley’s piece. What this piece did better than any other is show that Victor Frankenstein is the monster – how it should be.

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Benedict Cumberbatch and Jonny Lee Miller both won Best Actors in the 2012 Olivier awards for their portrayals of Frankenstein and his monster (they played both the creator and the creation!). Viewing this piece again, in the future, is hopefully likely. It was filmed and showcased in cinemas as part of National Theatre live and if it returns, make sure to see it.

As a final note, somewhere on his journey, the monster is named Frankenstein. It’s not uncommon for people to believe this and it’s fair to. The posters weren’t always clear with it and soon it was adopted.

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Is it wrong to name him? Absolutely! Although the monster does label himself after his father…

At length the thought of you crossed my mind. I learned from your papers that you were my father, my creator; and to whom could I apply with more fitness than to him who had given me life? (Chapter 16)

…it doesn’t exclude the fact that no one gives him a label. No one named him, no one claimed him. The essence of his struggle can’t be taken away!

This is only scratching the surface on the number of times the monster has been depicted. I’ll note, of course he’s not the only character to undergo a makeover. Dracula is another, so is Batman! Compare Adam Wests’ Batman to Christian Bale’s and it’s mad.

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Nonetheless, it’s evident the monster has been transformed. There are some other pieces that are very close to the book. At times, we’ve seen resemblance and other times, we’ve been a million miles from it…

…and that’s okay, I think. As mentioned before, it seems odd to include the monster and other characters when the story trying to be told would do fine with an original setting and cast. But the legacy that Shelley ignited will forever be retold. We’re still left with the source, and that’s what’s important. As long as we have the original, which we always will, fans can go crazy with their ideas. I’m sure Shelley would have been honoured to see so many people interpret her story and her characters in so many different ways. It’s fascinating how far this character has been taken.

And besides, there’s quite a lot of appeal to seeing how far people will take it.

How about Me, Myself and Frankenstein…

…Or Frankenstein and Snakes on a Plane!….

Or Frankenstein in Space!

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Powerful Themes – Time, Memory and Love

A short piece containing some of my favourite pieces of writing, with a bit extra.

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John Hurt in the Gate Theatre Dublin production of “Krapp'’s Last Tape” at Center Theatre Group’s Kirk Douglas Theatre						Photo by Ryan Miller/Capture Imaging

Time, memory and love are some of the top, most prominent themes in writing. They are regularly the key topic when it comes to a story or otherwise an umbrella theme for others. One reason why I actively seek stories which encompass and explore these themes is because they’re universal. Every human being to have ever lived will have experienced some form of love, memory and without a doubt, a sense of time. Whether these things are in an abundance of or a lack of, they’re relatable, understandable and translate across all mediums of art.

Below, I’ve compiled a small list of my favourite pieces where these themes synergise and flourish. Some old and some young, they are complete masterpieces in my eyes and I’d highly recommend reading or watching them when you get the chance. Most of them I’m sure people have heard of but if there’s one that’s new to…

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Powerful Themes – Time, Memory and Love

Time, memory and love are some of the top, most prominent themes in writing. They are regularly the key topic when it comes to a story or otherwise an umbrella theme for others. One reason why I actively seek stories which encompass and explore these themes is because they’re universal. Every human being to have ever lived will have experienced some form of love, memory and without a doubt, a sense of time. Whether these things are in an abundance of or a lack of, they’re relatable, understandable and translate across all mediums of art.

Below, I’ve compiled a small list of my favourite pieces where these themes synergise and flourish. Some old and some young, they are complete masterpieces in my eyes and I’d highly recommend reading or watching them when you get the chance. Most of them I’m sure people have heard of but if there’s one that’s new to you, I’d be happy to have shared a great piece of art.

In no particular order…

Poem: During Wind and Rain
by Thomas Hardy (1917)

“And the rotten rose is ript from the wall.”

Any fans of Hardy will know that his poems carry immense weight. Give this a read if you haven’t – it depicts four stanzas of seasons each detailing fond memories of his family which end with the change of season, bringing with it disturbing images and unsetting scenes which eradicate the love and memories that were once there. Time is obviously the feared enemy here; although arguably the thoughts are irrational, Hardy nevertheless is installed with fear for what will inevitably arrive and erase. This list has started with a storm but it’s near perfect.

Film: Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind
by Michel Gordy  and Charlie Kaufman (2012)

“What a loss to spend that much time with someone, only to find out that she’s a stranger.”

I wish I had written this film – it’s beautiful. Jim Carrey (Joel) and Kate Winslet (Clementine) play opposite each other in this relationship drama with a dollop of comedy. Memory and love are more of the core themes whereas time plays more as form of narrative. After a sour time spent as girlfriend and boyfriend, Clementine decides to play the full house and erase Joel from her memory. I’d say the rest writes itself but it really doesn’t – there is nothing cliché in this story and it’s originality has made it an outstanding film. There’s a lot of surprises in this and the way the story is told is unlike any other. It’s creativity at its best. I’ll add – it’s got of my favourite title sequences in a film, too.

Play: Krapp’s Last Tape
by Samuel Beckett (1958)

“When there was a chance of happiness. But I wouldn’t want them back. Not with the fire in me now. No, I wouldn’t want them back.”

I’m a huge Beckett fan, if it wasn’t obvious already. This play is the epitome of the tri-fusion of the themes time, memory and love. It’s very much the introvert play by Beckett and it dives deep into the personal life and memories of Krapp. The entire play is him listening to versions of his younger selves on a tape recorder; they play back his memories and he relives his days of youth – not necessarily with happiness. Of course, it includes the absurdist themes Beckett is famous for and a few funny moments, but the delivery in his piece, the depth at which the writing it goes, is monumental. It’s sewn with regret, sorrow and grief – it’s a haunting piece. The filmed version with John Hurt depicts this character brilliantly.

I’ve linked the script in the title. I implore you to give the play a quick search in your local theatres and see if there’s a production of it (or watch the John Hurt version) – this is a piece to see.

Short film: Yearbook by
Bernardo Britto (2014)
(Apologies, can’t find a link to this!)

This short film has stuck with me since it first came out. Even though memory definitely seems to be the prominent theme, time has gone hand in hand with it – and there’s a pinch of love. It’s beautifully animated with some very quirky scenes and it’s accompanied by a delicate, memorable piece from Matthew Cooper. It’s the ultimate heartstring tugger and I’m very happy to have stumbled upon it. I don’t want to give too much away, I think it’s best to just dive in and absorb – if you haven’t seen it, please take 5 minutes of your time to give this a watch. It has massively influenced my writing.

I hope there’s something new here for someone. I understand my fascination with these themes may not rub off onto everyone else as people might perhaps think they’re exhausted topics. But for me, they never will be. As I mentioned before, there’s infinite ways to tell stories with each of these themes because they’re unique to the individual.